Lift UP!

Lift Up! Benefit at Green Mountain CrossFit

Lift Up! Benefit
Saturday, April 6, 2019
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Join Green Mountain CrossFit and Green Mountain United Way for a day of weightlifting to raise funds for Green Mountain United Way. 50% of all proceeds go to Green Mountain United Way to support the fantastic work they do in and around our local community. Try for a new personal record and support a great cause!
The format will be a single registration at $50. Registration allows you to establish a one rep max in any or all of six lifts: Shoulder Press, Bench Press, Back Squat, Deadlift, Snatch, and Clean & Jerk. This is a non-sanctioned, family-friendly lifting event and is open to all ages and abilities. Each year many personal bests are reached, and we expect more of the same this year with support from an enthusiastic crowd of lifters, CrossFit athletes, and the local community. Lifting is not required to attend, and we encourage the general public to show up and cheer on regular folks from the local community doing extraordinary lifts for a great cause. There are also many opportunities to volunteer to support this event.
For more information about the competition go to www.facebook.com/greenmountaincrossfit. Register online at www.greenmountaincrossfit.com/events. For more information about the event, contact Green Mountain CrossFit at their Berlin location at 802-229-4131 or at nick@greenmountaincrossfit.com.

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Volunteer of the Month: Darcy and Rags

The train depot in St. Johnsbury in the late 1800s or early 1900s was a bustling hub of transportation and commerce. Products of the industrial revolution boom town making their way to distant parts unknown. Passengers inside the 1883 Queen Anne-style building, awaiting their train on one of the railroad lines stopping there. Today, when you stop by the station, you find a welcome center, the town’s offices, exhibits on the area’s history, and volunteers like Darcy LaPointe and her dog Rags, ready to greet you with a warm and welcoming smile.



Born in North Carolina, Darcy spent most her life living in Minneapolis, after moving around quite a bit as a child. While the weather here might have its similarities to Minnesota, she says, “Vermont is so different from the way I was living before. I had to learn a lot.” Specifically, she adds,small-town life was the biggest adjustment.

“I never expected to live in a small town,” Darcy says. “We moved out here because my daughter decided to teach, she graduated and was going to start teaching. She wanted to teach at a small school and we thought, ‘well, we could go to northern Minnesota, but we could go anywhere.’ She teaches science and math and was really interested in the environment, and that’s a leading thing that we found here, interest in the environment.”

After relocating here, Darcy began working with Vermont Associates for Training and Development, an organization that provides training and employment services for adults aged 55 or older. “What they do is, anyone who is over age 54 and doesn’t have a job, or if they have a disability, can go and learn different jobs in different areas that are mostly volunteer-type jobs,” Darcy says. “You can be at Catamount Arts or you could be at the museum or you could be at the library and be learning new things so that maybe you can find work somewhere. I worked at the welcome center for a while, as a part-time thing and I really liked it.”

That experience led her to begin working at the welcome center as a volunteer, around three years ago, she says. Originally, she worked three days per week but has recently gone down to two days, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, between two and five. She’ll be at the counter as soon as you walk in, accompanied by her toy poodle, Rags.

“He always greets everybody with me. I feel like he is the one that is the biggest welcome,” she says, adding that Rags takes a job that she thought she could never do and makes it possible for her. “I always have been very quiet and alone and not really…to actually help visitors who come to the town, this was really a challenge for me. Rags has made it so easy. People come in and they smile, they see him and he’s just adorable and they love him. It makes it so easy. People that love dogs always come up and talk to me about him. People who aren’t that interested, he doesn’t bother. He doesn’t bark, he doesn’t do any of those things. He likes to lay down and look like he is real tired so people will come and pet him.”

“I enjoy helping people if they are confused or if they don’t know what we have or what to do or something like that. It’s really a nice position for me,” Darcy says. Most of the questions she gets are about where to eat or stay in town, giving her a chance to recommend some of the great places in St. Johnsbury. “We have a lot of really good places to eat. So, it’s pretty much what they want, what kind of food they want. With motels, I always try to help them find something that is within their budget.”

One of the other great things about the job, she says, is the chance to meet and get to know some of the residents of a town she describes as “incredibly interesting,” primarily due to its long and fascinating history. “I’ve met so many people from the town because I see them come in to go into the town offices or the clerk. The ones who have been here their whole life, they have so many stories to tell me about what it has been like. I really appreciate it.”

Darcy also appreciates the opportunity to meet people from “everywhere,” noting that she encounters visitors from places as varied as England, Australia and Argentina. “That really makes my day when I get to meet somebody from that far away and they’re coming here and they’re appreciating all the things that we have here.”

Returning visitors give her a chance to develop a bit more of a relationship with some people, who she says always remember her and the “mascot” of the St. Johnsbury welcome center. She adds with a laugh, “They don’t ever forget me because I have Rags.”

Greeters like Darcy and Rags welcome over 10,000 visitors to the St. Johnsbury Welcome Center each year. In 2018, they saw visitors from all over the United States, including predictable visits from states in New England, but also visits from Indiana, Florida, California and other states. Additionally, the Welcome Center helped to introduce St. Johnsbury to visitors from 245 countries, as far away as Peru, Kazakhstan, and Norway, and as close as Canada. The Welcome Center is an important link that gives visitors the tools they need to navigate Vermont’s rural landscape, enjoy the natural beauty, recreation, food, and fun they came to find in the Northeast Kingdom, and support the vitality of the wonderful communities that we locals get to enjoy all year long.

The Volunteer of the Month is a feature compiled by the Green Mountain United Way focusing on the contributions of local volunteers whose volunteer work benefits local nonprofit organizations in Green Mountain United Way’s service territory. For more information, or to nominate a volunteer to be featured here, go to www.gmunitedway.org/volunteer-of-the-month.

Photo credit: St. Johnsbury Welcome Center

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How Rachel uses financial coaching to help women at Vermont Works for Women

Rachel, the Job Developer at Vermont Works for Women, was recently certified as a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach. As part of the economic stability work that she does, Rachel helps women improve their resumes, as well as set and plan for career goals, but recently she was asked to present to a group of women at a domestic violence shelter here in Northern Vermont about money management basics. The women in the group all live together at the shelter and are comfortable and familiar with one another so discussing finances was something they felt able to do together. Rachel decided to use her Financial Coaching skills to help them build skills and learn new tools during her time with them.

For many women domestic abuse and financial abuse often go together. Some of the women in attendance had left difficult circumstances with little or no money because their former partner had emptied their shared bank accounts. Circumstances like these make financial conversations even more difficult because of the strong emotions associated with money.

For the workshop, Rachel set her own goal of sharing some of the basic money-management skills she had learned in becoming a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach:

  • Using a cash-flow spending plan and scheduling bills/expenses to line up with income so you can make it through the month
  • Tracking expenses in order to know where your money is going
  • Saving money for emergencies with a goal of $500
  • Plugging spending leaks, exercising mindfulness around spending, and looking to reduce, not necessarily eliminate, certain spending
  • Making SMART financial goals

Many of the participants had never heard of SMART goal setting. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound and is used in financial coaching to break down a big goal (I want to buy a house) into smaller goals that work toward that end (I want to raise my credit score 50 points by next May).

One participant was hoping to get her own apartment and the group workshopped her goal to help her break it down into smaller SMART goals with deadlines. They determined how much she would need to save each week, how she was going to logistically make sure that the money was saved – would she put cash aside in an envelope? Open a separate savings account? Could she have a portion of her paycheck automatically deposited? Did she have to visit the bank each week? In the end, the woman left with a step-by-step plan that was tailored to her specific needs, habits, and life, and she knew exactly how she was going to save up for an apartment.

Rachel was glad to see the women each considering how the different skills and tools she brought could make a difference in their specific circumstances.

As a coach, Rachel plans to continue to use these tools with the women she sees one-on-one and other small groups that Vermont Works for Women assists.

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How Financial Coaching helps Faye’s clients improve access to healthy food!

Faye works for the Vermont Foodbank as a 3SquaresVT Outreach Coordinator. In her role she assists Vermonters in completing the 3SVT (formerly SNAP/food stamps) application and advocates for them through the process, she also works to ensure Vermonters are receiving the full 3SVT benefit they’re entitled to. Recently the Vermont Foodbank noticed that there were far fewer Vermonters over 60 enrolled in the program than are eligible. Closing this gap is a focus of Faye’s work.

After Faye joined the K.E.E.P. Financial Coaching Program she wondered how to integrate her new coaching and financial skills into her job. While working with a couple who, at first, seemed like they were ineligible for 3SquaresVT, she realized exactly how Financial Coaching could help her clients. Because of her experience with the intricacies of the 3SVT application process, Faye knew that her clients’ out-of-pocket medical expenses made a difference in their eligibility. While her clients had used budgeting for their monthly bills, they did not keep track of their out-of-pocket medical expenses. When she asked, they did not know whether they were spending $35 or more each month on out-of-pocket medical expenses. Faye realized that she could use her Financial Coaching skills to help this couple budget and track these expenses to ensure that they had the information they needed when it was time to apply for 3SVT.

Faye helped them to create a budget and tracking process for their medical expenses. By working with Faye the couple realized that they were spending above the $35 threshold. By tracking their expenses saving the documentation needed to back up their tracking, they were able to apply and become enrolled in 3SquaresVT. Now they receive over $100 per month in food assistance that they would not have been able to receive if Faye had not been a financial coach and used her in-depth knowledge of the 3SVT application process to find a way to help this couple get the additional food they need.

K.E.E.P. Financial Coaching is a Green Mountain United Way program that trains and supports financial coaches who are client-facing staff in nonprofit and community service agencies throughout our region. These coaches work directly with clients on many issues and as coaches can address financial issues to help address the financial instability at the core of many challenges that clients and community members face.

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Panel, Networking Event Brings Nonprofits Together to Learn

On a recent, crisp, cold January morning, over 20 nonprofits were represented in Norwich University’s Kreitzberg Library’s Multi-Purpose room for Green Mountain United Way and Norwich University’s Volunteer Coordinator Panel and Networking event. Carrie Stahler of Green Mountain United Way facilitated a discussion by panelists Greg McGrath from Norwich University, Erin Regan from The American Cancer Society and Patty Connor from Central Vermont Home Health and Hospice to discuss volunteer recruitment, placement, retention, and management from a variety of viewpoints.

Greg organizes campus events and activities throughout the school year working with various student groups to accomplish his work. Greg brought a studied volunteer management perspective and spoke about creating systems that benefit your organization and a volunteer’s interests. Erin’s focus is on working with groups of volunteers regionally to operate the Relay for Life events in Central Vermont and Caledonia County. Erin’s input helped us all learn more about successful outreach and relationship building, working with groups and committees, and she really lit up when talking about how to use social media to reach and communicate with volunteers. Patty brought us the perspective of a smaller nonprofit organization and covered how to engage volunteers in various tasks, how to work with departments who use volunteers to ensure volunteers and staff are working well together.

Nonprofits were engaged and had a lot of general and specific questions that informed the conversation. Nicole Didomenico from Norwich University’s Center for Civic Engagement hosted the event and shared her experience and ways that Norwich students could help organizations meet their volunteer needs and what limitations faced students that nonprofits should be aware of.

Green Mountain United Way holds volunteer coordinator meetings quarterly alternating between Central Vermont and the Northeast Kingdom. The next meeting will take place in the Northeast Kingdom in April. To get an invitation, join our mailing list by emailing volunteer@gmunitedway.org.

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Green Mountain United Way Hires Heather Labounty as Northeast Kingdom Working Bridges Resource Coordinator

Green Mountain United Way is pleased to announce the recent hire of Heather Labounty to its Working Bridges Program Staff. Heather Labounty has been hired to serve Working Bridges worksite locations as the full-time Northeast Kingdom Resource Coordinator.

Before joining Green Mountain United Way, Heather Labounty worked as a community health coordinator at Northern Counties Health Care. “I’m excited for the opportunity to be part of a growing organization that helps those in my own communities. I think this will be a great way to use my experience to help others, that’s what really motivates me,” said Ms. Labounty.

“After an extensive interview process, we were so pleased to hire Heather to this role. She brings with her invaluable on-the-ground experience serving the community in the Northeast Kingdom, and we are so fortunate to be able to bring this experience to the Northeast Kingdom employers and employees we serve through the Working Bridges program.” said Tawnya Kristen, Executive Director of Green Mountain United Way.

Working Bridges is an employee-service and workforce development program offered to business partners in the Green Mountain United Way service area covering the Northeast Kingdom and Central Vermont. Since launching the program in their service region in 2016, Green Mountain United Way’s Working Bridges program has expanded to serve four large employers and one small employer with a combined workforce of over 2000 individuals.

“This program has expanded so much in just two short years and we are so happy to have Heather join us to support this growth. Her experience and her open, friendly personality are an asset to the program and the community. We believe that the employees served by Working Bridges will be in excellent hands and that this will be a smooth and easy transition for Heather and for the workforce we support,” offered Pam Bailey

, Director of Programs and Operations at Green Mountain United Way and program manager for Working Bridges.

Ms. Labounty lives with her husband and two sons in St. Johnsbury and ran her own daycare center before changing her career to join the human services sector. She serves on the board of Sid’s Pantry, a food shelf in Concord, Vermont and is actively involved in her sons’ baseball league.  

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QPR Gatekeeper suicide prevention training

The Certified Trainers at Northeast Kingdom Human Services are holding a QPR gatekeeper training for community members:

Thursday, January 31, 2019 10am to noon at NKHS in Derby, Vermont

or

Wednesday, February 6, 2019 from 1:30 pm – 3:30pm at NKHS offices on Portland Street, St. Johnsbury, Vermont

To register contact Ruth Marquette at rmarquette@nkhs.net or call 802-334-6744 x 2140

For all details see the flyer:

NKHS.QPR.CommunityTrainingFlyer.Jan-Feb2019

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