Teaching the Importance of Gratitude

 

Vermont 2-1-1

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


Winter has definitely arrived and the rise in November’s contact volume remains a true harbinger of our cold weather season. The 5,030 contacts received at the 2-1-1 contact center make November’s total the fourth highest since March of this year. Falling temperatures during the month of November each year means the beginning of the winter spike in calls for Emergency Housing and Utility Assistance! Referrals to resources for help with emergency housing and utility assistance are the highest since February. This is an annual trend that we here at 2-1-1 have come to expect and to prepare for each fall.  All of our emergency housing partners know well that the numbers will continue to rise as winter settles in and temperatures continue to fall. The After-Hours Emergency Housing Program Report is available for your review through the link below.

Vermont’s Seasonal Fuel Assistance program, a supplemental benefit that offers assistance with payment for a portion of eligible Vermonters’ winter heating bills, undeniably makes a difference – sometimes large, sometimes small – in the lives of thousands of Vermonters who struggle under the seasonal burden of keeping their homes adequately heated.  Still, the most vulnerable of our community members are often left with the very real and often impossible challenge of keeping their heads above water through the cold winter months, and our contact center referrals will continue to reflect the difficult choices these Vermonters must make.

Another sure sign of the onset of the winter season and the anxieties it brings for many is reflected in the number of calls received for information about holiday programs. Seventy five percent of the calls for Individual and Family Support Programs this month were from Vermonters looking for assistance that would allow their families to participate in the traditions that make the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays a time of celebration. Historically, November calls begin to reflect the anxiety that the upcoming holidays provoke for many Vermonters, and it is with certainty that 2-1-1 contact specialists can state that these calls will continue to grow both in number and in desperation right up through December 24th. This November’s call volume in this sub-category shows a twenty-five percent increase over last November, and the number of referrals made to holiday programs in November has grown threefold over October.

A noteworthy increase this month is in the area of Public Assistance Programs sub-category. The total of 215 referrals is the highest amount of referrals for this category all year. Primarily, referrals were made to General Relief, an income maintenance program administered and funded entirely by each county that provides basic financial assistance for people who are indigent. Services available through the program may include cash allowances for qualifying individuals who have targeted special needs, emergency assistance in the form of temporary housing for people who are homeless, and the means to return to the state of legal residence for people who are stranded. This sub-category also includes referrals to Reach Up, 3SquaresVT, WIC and other State and Federal public assistance programs.

As we enter the “giving season” let’s do our best to remember that we grow by giving of ourselves. If you haven’t yet taken the opportunity to reach out a helping hand, consider doing so today. Our data shows that Vermont’s community food shelves, local emergency financial assistance programs, and holiday giving programs are responding to the needs of our neighbors as best they can.  You can make a difference! As this year’s November statistics show, the need continues to be great!  Consider contacting Vermont 2-1-1 for suggestions about holiday donations and volunteer opportunities in your region.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.

National Human Trafficking Awareness Month


January has been proclaimed as the Human Trafficking Awareness Month, a title that underscores the need to destigmatize important discussions about human trafficking and call attention to key facts and realities about human slavery. Following the start of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month in 2010 and in collaboration with multiple national non-profit organizations, National Human Trafficking Day was established and is observed annually on January 11th.

At Vermont 2-1-1, we believe it matters that our nation directs time, energy, and resources to responding to the problem of human trafficking. We have therefore agreed to be the designated number to call to access Vermont’s Rapid Response Support System (RRSS) that works to ensure that actual and potential victims of human trafficking receive support tailored to their needs from first responders such as law enforcement and emergency medical providers.

2-1-1 also actively participates in efforts to raise public awareness about the issue of human trafficking, and we hope that our commitment assists with mobilizing our fellow Vermonters to work to end what is essentially modern day slavery that exploits people’s dreams, robs them of their dignity, and violates their basic human rights.
Victims of human trafficking can be any age, gender, race, or immigration status; they live in cities, suburbs, and rural areas. Human traffickers relentlessly canvass ways to take advantage of people who face extreme adversity, violence, discrimination, or economic vulnerability and dependence.

Dial 2-1-1 to contact Vermont’s Rapid Response Service System. You can also visit vermont211.org to learn more about services and resources available to victims or to learn more about ways to get involved with efforts to end human trafficking. Use the following terms in our database to locate resources and agencies related to human trafficking prevention/intervention.

Terms: 

– Human Trafficking Hotlines
– Human Trafficking Prevention

Agencies:

Give Way to Freedom
Polaris
Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of November:

Top Services: Thanksgiving Programs (695 searches);
Christmas Programs (524 searches); Holiday Toys/Gifts (482 searches); Homeless Motel Vouchers (329 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (222 searches)

Top Agencies: Salvation Army (Rutland); United Ways of Northwest Vermont; Salvation Army (Burlington); Chances for Christmas; HOPE

Top Search by City: Burlington; Hancock; Middlebury; Saint Albans City; Rutland

Total Site Visits: 6302

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 2898


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 759 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for November here.


Teaching the Importance of Gratitude


The holiday season is the perfect time to think about the importance of gratitude. Most parents teach their children to say thank you, but being thankful and appreciative of the good things you have goes beyond manners and etiquette. Children who express and understand  what they are thankful for have less stress, a sense of belonging and are able to relate to other people’s feelings.

It’s natural for kids to be materialistic and self-serving at times. It takes time for small children to learn how to control impulsiveness, learn to share and handle strong emotions. But toddlers and preschoolers are great at modeling the behavior of the adults in their life. So start by setting a good example; show your gratitude for big and small things from gifts to a warm sunny day.

By grade school, children have a greater ability to think more deeply and can reflect on their day. Ask your child what they are grateful for each day at dinner or bedtime and share what you were grateful for today and why.
Some other ideas for teaching gratitude are; focus on the positives in your day, help children write thank you notes, make giving or volunteering a habit, have your child help you set aside toys and clothes to be donated to local charities and teach children to thank those who serve.

Most of all, remember to be patient. Kids can’t be forced into showing appreciation, but being a role model and using everyday gentle efforts can teach your child gratitude as a way of life.

 

 

 

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

 

Read More

Kids and Screen Time

 

 

Vermont 2-1-1

The staff and volunteers at Vermont 2-1-1 send you wishes for a happy holiday season and a reminder that you can dial 2-1-1 24 hours a day, every day of the year. 

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


October’s call volume of 2,540 is indicative of the changing season and 2-1-1 Contact Specialists are hunkering down for another very busy season helping those in need escape the often life-threatening cold nights. This month’s housing-related calls continue the historical trend of a significant uptick in the requests for referrals to housing resources. The Adverse Weather Conditions set forth by the Department for Children and Families started on November 1st , but the race to escape the cold weather had already begun during October. The number of referrals in the Housing/Shelter sub-category shows an 18% increase over September. This month these referrals make up 77% of the total in the Basic Needs category. October’s prelude to Vermont’s winter weather has local non-profits actively planning and preparing for the opening of their warming shelters. These mostly volunteer-run, cold weather shelters will serve the most vulnerable members of our Vermont communities and most will fill to capacity each night.

Another noteworthy increase in requests for assistance this month can be seen in the Public Assistance Programs sub-category.  These types of calls are clearly in line with the numbers we saw this past winter in January of 2017. Primarily, referrals were made to General Relief, an income maintenance program administered and funded entirely by each county, that provides basic financial assistance for people who are “indigent” – a term that should be understood as describing individuals in need who are truly down and out. This sub-category also includes referrals to Reach Up, 3SquaresVT, WIC and other State and Federal public assistance programs.

October’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day proved to be another successful, single-day push to remove unused prescription drugs from medicine cabinets as a preventive measure against misuse of leftover medications. Once again Vermonters were encouraged to participate by turning in unused, expired and unwanted prescription drugs at specified, local collection sites. This nationwide collection effort is held twice a year, but Vermonters can drop off their prescription drugs any day of the year at numerous local sites. Governor Phil Scott is promoting Vermont 2-1-1 as the number to call for a list of collection sites and Vermont 2-1-1 is working closely with the Vermont Department of Health to keep the medication drop-off information accurate and up-to-date. Contact Specialists responded to more than 60 calls and the Vermont 2-1-1 website showed 100 hits for this information in October alone, a good sign that Vermonters are interested in properly disposing of their unused medications.

Finally, October’s data reveals 67 referrals to the Disaster Services sub-category. The referrals were in response to sheltering information requests due to the worst recorded wind storm to hit Vermont. This powerful windstorm moved into regions of Vermont during the early morning hours on Monday, October 30th, downing trees, cutting power to thousands of homes and shuttering dozens of roads. While responding to requests for storm-related information and assistance, 2-1-1 Contact Specialists were also tracking Vermonters’ needs and sharing that with Vermont Emergency Management, the Agency of Human Services, American Red Cross, and other state and local partners. The information collected at the 2-1-1 Contact Center helped to identify the regions where community emergency shelters might be needed.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 203 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for October here.

Did You Know…?


You can reach us by phone 4 ways by:

  1. Simply dialing 2-1-1 – a local call from anywhere in Vermont
  2. Dialing 1-866-652-4636 – toll free in Vermont
  3. Dialing (802) 652-4636 – from outside of Vermont
  4. Texting your zip code – to 898211

The Vermont 2-1-1 Contact Center is available 24/7. Texting is only available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of October:

Top Services: Homeless Motel Vouchers (310 searches); Christmas Programs (166 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (153 searches); Community Meals (144 searches); Pet Care Services (140 searches)

Top Agencies: Salvation Army (Rutland); Champlain Office of Economic Opportunity (CVOEO); Northeast Kingdom Community Action (NEKCA); Salvation Army (Burlington); Vermont Department for Children and Families – Economic Services Division

Top Search by City: Burlington; Essex Junction; Hancock; New Haven; Rutland

Total Site Visits: 4609

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 2013

Kids and Screen Time


Smartphones, computers and other media devices are a part of our every day lives. But research has shown that when it comes to kids, too much tech and too little face-to-face time with family and friends can delay the development of communication, language and social skills.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), children 18 months and younger should not use screen media other than video-chatting with family and loved ones. For children 18 months to 5 years, parents should choose high-quality programming and apps that they view with their children and limit screen use to 1 hour or less per day. Parents should avoid letting children use media by themselves.

Here are some helpful tips for managing your family’s media use:

  • Make a family media use plan. This can help parents think about how to use media thoughtfully and make sure other important activities like sleep, outdoor-play, reading and family activities get priority. The AAP has a useful link to help families get started.
  • Set limits. In addition to limiting the amount of time your child uses media, know what platforms and apps your children are using, what sites they are visiting on the web, and what they are doing online.
  • Make unplugged playtime a daily priority. Unstructured play stimulates creativity and engaging in back-and-forth “talk time” is critical for language development and improves language skills much more than one-way interaction with a screen.
  • Be a good role model. Limiting your own media use means you will be more engaged with your child and be able to give them your full attention while setting a good example.
  • Create tech-free zones. Keep meal times and children’s bedrooms screen free. This encourages healthier eating habits and better sleep, which are critical for children’s wellness.
  • Don’t use technology as an emotional pacifier. Children need to be taught how to identify and handle strong emotions, learn how to come up with activities to manage boredom and ways to calm down and solve problems.  These are important skills for the healthy development of your child.

 

 

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

 

Read More

The Word Gap

 

Vermont 2-1-1

Join  ASIST —
Become A Life Saver!


Vermont 2-1-1 is hosting an ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) workshop on Wednesday, November 8th and Thursday, November 9th 2017.

ASIST is for caregivers who want to feel more comfortable, confident and competent in helping to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. Over one million caregivers have participated in this two-day, highly interactive, practical, practice-oriented workshop.

For more information on this training, please see our informational flyer or contact Cathy Nellis with questions.

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


This year’s “summer season” started late and lasted well into September!  This resulted in a calmer September in the 2-1-1 Contact Center, as reflected by the 1,861 contact total. Although phone lines may have been a bit quieter, September was a busy and exciting month at the contact center with the third year anniversary of Vermont 2-1-1’s participation in the Vermont Department of Health’s statewide Help Me Grow initiative!  Our Help Me Grow Specialized Information and Referral line is staffed by trained Child Development Specialists who are available to answer parent and caregiver questions about children’s behavioral and developmental needs. These specialists are providing families with tools to track development milestones and are connecting families to the appropriate resources in their communities. Parents, grandparents, service providers and doctor’s offices contacted the Help Me Grow line during its first year. Child Development Specialists responded to child development concerns and to parent and caregiver requests for help with meeting basic needs. Help Me Grow Child Development Specialists are available from 9:00am – 6:00pm Monday – Friday by dialing 2-1-1 and selecting option 6, or by texting HMGVT to 898211. You can also go to helpmegrowvt.org to learn more.

Statewide referrals to housing/shelter resources remind us of what is to come as the season changes and state parks come to close…Vermonters are beginning to prepare for the winter months. September continues the historical trend of a rise in the requests for referrals to housing resources.

September was also National Preparedness Month (NPM). NPM encourages Americans to take steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, schools, and communities. FEMA’s Ready Campaign, the correlating public education outreach campaign, disseminates information to help the general public prepare for and respond to emergencies, including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks. We should all take action to prepare! Go to ready.gov for more information. On October 21, Aaron Titus, author of How to Prepare for Everything: Empowering You to Face Disruption with Your Community and to Feel Good About the Future, will be presenting about his book in Montpelier. The first 25 registrants will receive an autographed copy of his book. For more information and to register, you can go to our website or Facebook page. You can also follow the link on the second page of this newsletter.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of September:

Top Services: Homeless Motel Vouchers (326 searches); Assistive Technology Equipment Loan (148 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (138 searches); Pet Care Services (121 searches); Christmas Programs (120 searches)

Top Agencies: Salvation Army (Rutland); Vermont Department for Children and Families – Economic Services Division; Vermont State Housing Authority; Champlain Office of Economic Opportunity (CVOEO); Northeast Kingdom Community Action (NEKCA)

Top Search by City: Burlington; Hancock; Brattleboro; New Haven; Saint Johnsbury

Total Site Visits: 4008

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 1815


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 145 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for September here.


How to Prepare for Anything
Workshop


Aaron Titus, Executive Director with Crisis Cleanup, is coming to Vermont to conduct a workshop to promote his latest book, How to Prepare for Anything, on Saturday, October 21, 2017, starting at 10:00 a.m.

Vermont Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VTVOAD), in conjunction with UpStreet Consulting, is proud to sponsor Aaron’s workshop to promote his new book. The event will be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Montpelier Ward, 224 Hersey Road, Berlin, Vermont. This workshop will provide attendees a great opportunity to learn how to prepare for unexpected events and disasters, Please click here for more information and to register.

October Is LGBT History Month


October is LGBT History Month, which originated in the United States in 1994, celebrating the achievements of 31 lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender “Icons” every year. Each day in October, a new LGBT Icon is featured with a video, a biography, and other resources. Vermont’s own cartoonist/author Alison Bechdel has been among the 341 Icons featured over the years.

To view the list, go to the LGBT History Month website. Searching the Vermont 2-1-1 database under the following terms will get you to the agencies that specialize in LBGT issues:

Cultural Awareness/Competencies Training* Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Bisexual Issues

Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Bisexual Advocacy Groups

Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Bisexual Community Centers

Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Bisexual Support Groups

Suicide Prevention Hotlines* Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Bisexual Individuals

The Word Gap


In the 1990’s, researchers conducted a study on the number of words spoken in households of children from poor, middle-class, and wealthy families. This landmark study discovered what we now call the word gap. They found that on average poor and low-income children were hearing about 616 words per hour, the average working-class child 1,251 words per hour, and affluent children 2,153 words per hour. According to NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children), a recent study shows the word gap between children in different socioeconomic groups grows significantly from 18 months to 3 years. By the time children turn 4, children from high-income families are exposed to 30 million more words than children from low-income families.

The word gap shows us how poverty can influence the opportunities children have for learning. Language and literacy skills early in life predict future success in kindergarten and beyond. These skills aren’t just about learning words; they are also about communication and social interaction, which, in addition to improving their school readiness, builds a child’s social skills and supports healthy development.

Language and literacy skills begin at birth through everyday interactions, such as sharing books, telling stories, singing songs and talking to one another. Help Me Grow VT has resources for families looking to bolster their child’s language and literacy skills and help close the word gap with parent tip sheets and information on story times at local libraries and area playgroups. To contact a child development specialist at Help Me Grow VT, dial 2-1-1 ext. 6 Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., or visit Help Me Grow VT’s website.

 

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

Read More

Making School Day Mornings Easier

 

Vermont 2-1-1

 

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


August’s increase in contacts over July’s total reveals, once again, the start of the annual trend of climbing contact totals that the close of summer brings. The end of August marks the long slow slide into another winter of stressful planning and difficult choices for many Vermont families. The increase in August contacts over July can be attributed primarily to increases in three categories: Basic Needs, Educational Support and Mental Health and Substance Abuse. Specific examples are Rutland County’s increase in its contact total due to increased referrals to the Mental Health and Substance Abuse category, Franklin County’s increased referrals to public assistance programs, and Windham County’s additional contacts related to requests for housing and temporary financial assistance.

A steady increase in referrals to housing and shelter resources reminds us of those who recall all too well what being out in the cold feels like and what is soon to come. The increase in referrals in August to housing and shelter resources pushed August numbers closer to those of this year’s chilly month of March. The onset of longer, cooler nights will continue to make for higher numbers of requests for emergency shelter. In anticipation, our local communities are once again coming together to plan on how to keep their most vulnerable residents warm and safe from the elements this winter. Many local efforts exist and information about those efforts and the services they hope to provide can be found by contacting Vermont 2-1-1.

Vermont’s United Ways understand just how crucial access to essential services is for children and youth to achieve their potential and strives, through strategic initiatives and by funding local agency and nonprofit education programs, to see that all children enter school ready to succeed. August’s increase in referrals to Educational Support Services speaks to the number of parents who are concerned with sending their children off to school prepared to learn. Referrals were made to parents looking for information about assistance with provision of school supplies, Head Start Programs and GED instruction, just to name a few of the types of education related requests made by Vermont families.

United Way campaigns are “kicking off” in September! Please support your local United Way in its continued efforts to address the needs of our Vermont communities.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of August:

Top Services: Homeless Motel Vouchers (344 searches); Community Meals (162 searches); Pet Care Services (152 searches); Assistive Technology Equipment Loan (151 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (128 searches)

Top Agencies: Salvation Army (Rutland); Lamoille Family Center; Vermont Department for Children and Families – Economic Services Division; CVOEO; Caroline Baird Crichfield Fund

Top Search by City: Hancock; East Fairfield; Burlington; Brattleboro; New Haven

Total Site Visits: 4709

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 1825


Local United Ways Kickoff Annual Campaigns


Each year we see United Way volunteers and staff put on their campaign hats and venture out to raise money for the organization. Your local United Way is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people in your local communities by addressing critical human needs in the critical cornerstone areas of education, financial stability, and health. By bringing people and organizations together around innovative solutions, our local United Ways impact thousands of lives every year. These collaborative, community-based, community-led solutions advance the common good and strive to create a good quality of life for all. The United Way delivers the solutions needed to drive change, but the change starts with each of us. Together we are stronger!

As a program of the United Ways of Vermont, Vermont 2-1-1 asks you to join us in living united! Your contributions will be working year-round building a brighter future for our children, enriching the lives of our elderly, giving hope to those who are hurting, strengthening families, and so much more.

Please join us in helping to build a better future! Thank you.


Mentorship: A Game Changer in the Life of a Child


Research confirms that quality mentoring relationships have powerful positive effects on young people in a variety of personal, academic and professional situations. Adult role modeling through informal and/or formal relationship-building initiatives has a transformative effect on both the youth within a community and on the community itself.

Mentoring, at its core, guarantees young people that there is someone who cares about them, assures them they are not alone in dealing with day-to-day challenges, and makes them feel like they matter. Ultimately, mentoring connects children and youth to positive personal growth and development which in turn connects them to greater social and economic opportunity.

Mobius, Vermont’s lead mentor matching agency, provides the Vermont Youth Mentoring Partnership Program that assists with recruitment and placement of mentors throughout the state. Vermont’s regional United Ways also provide opportunities to connect with local mentoring programs via their Volunteer Center Programs.

For information about becoming a mentor or about starting a mentoring program explore Vermont 2-1-1’s database using the following terms:

How to Prepare for Anything

Workshop


Aaron Titus, Executive Director with Crisis Cleanup, is coming to Vermont to conduct a workshop to promote his latest book, How to Prepare for Anything, on Saturday, October 21, 2017, starting at 10:00 a.m.

Vermont Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VTVOAD), in conjunction with UpStreet Consulting, is proud to sponsor Aaron’s workshop to promote his new book. The event will be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Montpelier Ward, 224 Hersey Road, Berlin, Vermont. Please contact us if you would like to join Aaron and others interested in preparing for unexpected events and disasters.

Click here to visit Help Me Grow VT's website!
Making School Day Mornings Easier


In Vermont, it can be hard to say good bye to the warm, long summer days. While many families stay busy through out the summer, it’s a time when routines can become a little more relaxed. But now school has started and for many families mornings can be hectic. Getting kids ready for their day and out the door on time can be a struggle. Here are some helpful tips to make school day mornings a little less stressful:

  • Get done what you can the night before. Pack lunches and backpacks before bed. Help your child lie out their clothes for the next day.
  • Make a routine schedule or “Morning To-Do List”. Whether it’s a written list for kids who can read or a visual chart with pictures for the younger ones, list routine items in order (i.e. get dressed, eat breakfast, brush teeth…) it helps kids know what comes next and keeps them on track.
  • A good morning starts with a good night’s sleep. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 3-5 year olds should get 10-13 hours sleep (this includes naps) and 6-12 year olds should get 9-12 hours. Getting enough sleep makes getting up in the morning easier and helps children focus and learn at school. Make sure your family sticks to a bedtime.
  • A good breakfast starts a good day. Breakfast is the fuel every kid needs to start their day right. It improves concentration and helps them do better in school. It’s essential but it doesn’t have to put your family in a time crunch. There are plenty of easy to make and even “eat on the way” options that give kids the protein and nutrients they need, such as yogurt with fruit and granola
  • End on a positive note. Whether it’s a hug or a wave and a smile, your send-off is how your child is starting their day at school. Make it a good one, even if you’re running late. It sets the tone for your child’s day.


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 139 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for August here.

 

 

 

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

 

Read More

September is National Preparedness Month

Vermont 2-1-1


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 125 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for July here.

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


Vermont 2-1-1 responded to 1,901 contacts during the month of July, a total that is, like the June total, reflective of the financial relief that our few short months of summer offer.  Many Vermonters allow themselves a brief respite from those worrisome thoughts about the impending cold season and the added stressors it will inevitably bring.

The Basic Needs category contact volume this month shows a slight increase over June’s contact volume for this category. This reminds us that there are many Vermonters who are struggling to meet their basic needs throughout the year, particularly housing and utility related needs.

In July, the sub-category Temporary Financial Assistance hit a calendar year high with a 28% increase over June.  At Vermont 2-1-1, Contact Specialists do their best to connect Vermonters to resources to supplement their incomes by referring to both public assistance programs and to other local community assistance programs offered by non-profit organizations throughout the state.

A flurry of calls for Disaster Services in July is directly related to the flooding just prior to the Fourth of July holiday. Vermonters affected by the storms reported damages mostly to driveways and culverts but there were a few who weren’t so fortunate. Muck outs and debris removal efforts by Upper Valley Strong COAD (Community Organizations Active in Disaster) and The Southern Baptist Disaster Services volunteers were greatly appreciated by those whose homes and yards were damaged by the flooding. The Vermont Disaster Relief Fund was activated to provide case management and financial help. Vermont did receive a Federal Declaration for public assistance after the storm, as roads were washed away from the storms.

Real emergency preparedness begins long before any hint of a disaster. It starts with people discussing scenarios and saying, “What if…” and then conceiving of response and recovery strategies and planning accordingly. Vermont 211 staff works with Vermont Emergency Management and VT VOAD (Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster) in continued efforts to educate, plan and practice for the real event.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of July:

Top Services: Homeless Motel Vouchers (279 searches); Community Meals (171 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (141 searches);  Assistive Technology Equipment Loan (128 searches);
Household Goods Donation Programs (115 searches)

Top Agencies: Vermont Department for Children and Families – Economic Services Division; Salvation Army (Rutland); CVOEO; Wayward Wheels; Epilepsy Foundation of Vermont

Top Search by City: Hancock; Burlington; Lincoln; Rutland; Brattleboro

Total Site Visits: 4068

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 1696


Local United Ways Kickoff Annual Campaigns


Each year we see United Way volunteers and staff put on their campaign hats and venture out to raise money for the organization. Your local United Way is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people in your local communities by addressing critical human needs in the critical cornerstone areas of education, financial stability, and health. By bringing people and organizations together around innovative solutions, our local United Ways impact thousands of lives every year. These collaborative, community-based, community-led solutions advance the common good and strive to create a good quality of life for all. The United Way delivers the solutions needed to drive change, but the change starts with each of us. Together we are stronger!

As a program of the United Ways of Vermont, Vermont 2-1-1 asks you to join us in living united! Your contributions will be working year-round building a brighter future for our children, enriching the lives of our elderly, giving hope to those who are hurting, strengthening families, and so much more.

Please join us in helping to build a better future! Thank you.


September is National Preparedness Month


National Preparedness Month reminds us that during an emergency every minute counts and planning ahead can make all the difference in keeping you and your family safe during a disaster.  This year’s theme of “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can” emphasizes the safety and security benefits that development of emergency preparedness plans provide. There are key steps that every Vermont household can take to be better prepared for the different types of disasters and emergencies that can happen in their communities.

Vermont 2-1-1, in partnership with Vermont Emergency Management, Vermont Department of Health, and the American Red Cross – New Hampshire/Vermont Region, provides information about disaster preparedness planning. Emergency preparedness information is always available on our website. A quick search using the three terms listed below will provide the information and guidance that any Vermonter would need to create a disaster plan.

In Vermont there are two particularly important preparedness tools to be aware of that are offered to Vermonters free of charge.

The first, designed to assist individuals with special needs for assistance during a disaster, is the Citizen Assistance Registry in case of an Emergency (CARE). Vermont 211 and E-911 are working together to identify Vermont residents who would require special assistance in an emergency.  For additional information about this program and/or to download a CARE registration form, visit http://e911.vermont.gov/care or go to this page, which also includes a table of emergency resources with links. Clicking the image below will also link you directly to the registration form.

The second, designed to provide all Vermonters with emergency notifications, is Vermont Alert (VTAlert). Vermont Alert is the state system designed to keep Vermonters informed about emergency situations, weather alerts, or road information – among other details that could affect everyday life.  Users select what information they wish to receive, how they receive that information – email, text, phone call, etc. – and for what areas the alerts pertain.  VT Alert is a free service, and it only takes a few minutes to sign up for an account. Visit www.vtalert.gov to sign up.

Additional disaster preparedness/planning links:


Understanding the Diaper Gap


The diaper gap, or diaper need, is about not having enough clean diapers to keep an infant or toddler clean, dry and healthy. Many families fall into the diaper gap in the US and Vermont families are no exception. According to the National Diaper Bank Network, 1 in 3 moms in the US reports suffering from diaper need. Diapers are a basic need, like food and shelter. Not having clean diapers impacts the physical well-being of children and the mental and economical well-being of their parents and caregivers.

Here are some facts about the diaper gap:

Children in poor or low-income households are at the greatest risk.

  • 5.3 million children in the US aged 3 or younger live in families that are poor or low-income.
  • Diapers cannot be obtained with benefit programs such as food stamps (3 Squares in Vermont) or WIC benefits
  • Medicaid or Dr Dynasaur (Vermont’s Medicaid program for children) does not cover the cost of diapers.
  • There are no state or federal “safety net” programs that allocate money specifically for the purchase of diapers.
  • In Vermont, diaper assistance is sometimes provided by food banks and social service agencies. However, they often have limited ability to help with diapers and families often have to qualify for their other services to be eligible to receive diaper assistance.

Not having enough clean diapers poses a health risk. 

  • When families don’t have enough clean diapers, babies remain in soiled ones longer or diapers are reused. This can lead to infections and other serious health issues.

Diapers are expensive.

  • Diapers can cost $70-$80 per month because on average infants need 6 to 12 diapers per day, toddlers may need up to 8 per day.
  • In 2016, the maximum Reach Up benefit for a Vermont household of 1 parent and 2 children was $640. This is the only federal assistance program that can be used to purchase diapers.  It also has to cover other household expenses such as heat, rent, electricity, clothing, transportation and other basic needs.
  • Families without transportation have to buy diapers at smaller convenience stores rather than bulk-buying at “box stores” (such as Costco or Walmart). This causes low-income families to spend twice as much on diapers.

Most child care centers require parents to provide at least 1 day’s worth of disposable diapers.

  • Nationally, 31% of families that are low-income have at least one parent who works full time. Parents count on child care to be able to go to work or attend school. Without diapers, a child cannot attend and the parent cannot go to work.
  • Not working can disqualify a family from child care subsidy programs that not only help parents stay in the work force, but help a child stay in early education programs, which is a key foundation to our children’s learning and development.
  • Cloth diapers are less expensive than disposable ones, but the majority of child care centers do not accept cloth diapers.

Diaper banks are programs that specifically provide diapers to families in need. There are over 300 diaper banks across the country. Vermont has only one diaper bank with a limited service area. To learn more about the diaper gap and how you can help Vermont families facing diaper need, visit the National Diaper Bank Network.

 

Watch Vermont 2-1-1’s Television Commercial below

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

Read More

Powering Up: How to Create Change Through Legislation

 

SAVE THE DATE!  September 11th

 

SAVE THE DATE- September 11, 2017

Powering Up: How to Create Change through Legislation
A day-long, peer organized, statewide conference

 

Location:    Capitol Plaza Hotel and Conference Center, Montpelier, VT

Time:          8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Cost:          Free with lunch and snacks provided

Organized By:

Vermont Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health
                Vermont Psychiatric Survivors
                Vermont Recovery Network

Who Should Attend:

People in recovery from substance use; young adults and families experiencing social, emotional or behavioral challenges; and consumers, ex-patients, psychiatric survivors, and folks the world has labeled “mentally ill.”

Format:

Panel presentations, keynote address, workshop, and breakout skill-building groups designed to increase knowledge of the legislative process, increase our collective power, and build stronger advocacy skills.
More Info: Contact Logan Selkirk at lselkirk@vffcmh.org

 

 

Funded in part by

home

 

 

 

 

Check these out!

 

 

 

Mental Health Always Matters Children’s PSA Mental Health Always Matters Family PSA I Am the World
Diversity Rocks
STAY CONNECTED:
Vermont Federation of Families, PO Box 1577, Williston, VT 05495

 

Read More

Vermont 2-1-1 Launches Texting Platform!

Vermont 2-1-1


Vermont 2-1-1 Launches Texting Platform!


Vermont 2-1-1 now offers four ways to find local resources in Vermont:

1. Dial 2-1-1 or (866) 652-4636 to speak with a highly trained Contact Specialist who will provide individualized assistance 24 hours a day/7 days a week

2. Text your zip code to 898211 for help Monday through Friday 8am to 8pm

3. Search online at http://vermont211.org

4. Email info@vermont211.org

Read the full press release here.

Vermont 2-1-1 Monthly Contact Statistics

A message from the Director, MaryEllen Mendl


June’s contact volume of 1,972 reflects the more financially manageable period that the summer months provide for many here in Vermont. The annual increase in contact volume that the fall and winter months always bring, with requests for home heating assistance and emergency shelter, always tapers off as summer settles in and monthly financial stressors are reduced. For many Vermonters the summer season means time for catching up on overdo utility bills, making much needed vehicle repairs, and setting aside whatever they can in anticipation of another long cold winter.

Each year, the onset of summer brings with it the types of requests for information and referral that reflect a return to the typical day-to-day struggles that some Vermont families continue to face. This year’s June data reveals spikes for information and referrals to food resources, legal services, money management and public health. Most alarming is a notable rise in referrals to Domestic Violence Hotlines (64% of the referrals under the Mental Health Assessment and Treatment Subcategory). The increase in referrals to housing/shelter resources from May to June can be attributed to this increase in calls for referrals to Domestic Violence Hotlines.

The subcategory Legal Services also reveals an increase in May and June with more referrals being made to lawyer referral services and tenant rights information. Rutland and Orleans Counties saw referrals for Legal Services double from the previous month.

More Vermonters contacted Vermont 2-1-1 for Food Programs this year. Once again, in partnership with Hunger Free Vermont’s initiatives to reduce hunger and food insecurity, Vermont 2-1-1 is designated as the number to call for information about the free Summer Meal Programs and other summer food resources. Working to assure that Vermont children have daily access to adequate food during the summer school recess is a top priority for Hunger Free Vermont and year after year 2-1-1 call statistics verify the need. The top referred service in the Food sub-category is Food Pantries (46% of sub-category). Even Vermonters receiving 3SquaresVT are still struggling to keep the cupboards full.

Read Vermont 2-1-1’s monthly contact volume report here.


HMG VT Update


June brings the end of school and the start of summer!

It also means that local farmers markets have started their summer season. Farmers markets are a great way for families to enjoy locally grown fruits and vegetables and build a sense of community.

According to the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, there are 73 summer farmers markets in Vermont, each are of different sizes offering a variety of vendors, products and often entertainment! To ensure all families are able to take advantage of fresh, healthy foods during the summer months, many markets accept EBT cards and low-income families can access Farm to Family coupons to use at farmer’s markets from their area Community Action Agency.

Some markets participate in the Crop Cash program. Families who use their 3Squares EBT card at farmers markets that participate in Crop Cash can double their benefits. So for every $1.00 in 3Squares benefits they spend, they can get $1.00 matched in Crop Cash, up to $10/day! If you are a prenatal parent or parent with children through age 8, call Help Me Grow VT by dialing 2-1-1 ext. 6 for more information about how your family can access local farmer’s market programs. We can also provide information on other food and nutrition programs such as 3Squares, WIC, and summer meal sites.


Vermont 2-1-1 Web Statistics


In addition to the contact statistics, the following data is from the 2-1-1 website and shows how the public used the database search engine during the month of June:

Top ServicesHousehold Goods Donation Programs (179 searches); Clothing Donation Programs (146 searches); Community Meals (136 searches); Assistive Technology Equipment Loan (114 searches); Case/Care Management (70 searches)

Top Agencies: Salvation Army (Rutland); Vermont Department for Children and Families – Economic Services; Vermont Center for Independent Living; The Bus; CVOEO

Top Search by City: Burlington; Hancock; New Haven; Lincoln; Saint Albans

Total Site Visits: 4307

Unique (First-Time) Visitors: 1575


Summer Safety Tips for Family Fun in the Sun


Summer has finally arrived, and family vacation, outdoor play, and days at water’s edge mean that kids are out there climbing, jumping, swinging, swimming, and well, playing just about as hard as they can! This, of course, means there is a good amount of falling, crashing, tumbling, banging, and bruising – all part of being a kid, and we wouldn’t have it any other way!  There are things, however, that parents and caregivers can do to avoid the more serious injuries all of this wonderful outdoor activity might cause.

Vermont’s chapter of Safe Kids, led by UVM Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital, provides public awareness, education, and resource information and supports evidence-based workshops and clinics that help parents and caregivers prevent childhood injuries. Whether looking for safety tips about watching kids while they are in and around water, on the playground, or at the campsite, Safe Kids is the go-to place, dedicated solely to raising public awareness and preventing childhood injuries.  For injury-prevention and life-saving tips visit www.safekids.org, or for additional information about Vermont’s Safe Kids coalition, contact Christina Keating at (802) 847-2291 or by e-mail at Christina.Keating@uvmhealth.org.

To find Safe Kids Vermont in the 2-1-1 database, search by agency name or search by any of the following key words:

For additional resources specific to early childhood safety information contact Vermont 2-1-1 Help Me Grow Specialists by dialing 2-1-1, Ext. 6.


Emergency Housing in Vermont


Through a partnership with the State of Vermont’s Economic Services Division, Vermont 2-1-1 administers the After Hours Emergency Housing Program beginning at 4:30pm weekdays, throughout weekends and on state/federal holidays. Housing in Vermont has reached a critical need.

Vermont 2-1-1 Information and Referral (I&R) Specialists responded to 109 calls regarding housing needs. I&R specialists provide needs assessment, problem-solving support, and information and referrals to a wide range of services to each caller. Review Vermont 2-1-1’s Emergency Housing Report for June here.

Vermont’s Annual Count of Homelessness Shows Mixed Results


MONTPELIER, VT – 1,225 Vermonters were found to be literally homeless on a single night in January. The 2017 Point-in-Time Count Report, released today by the Vermont Coalition to End Homelessness and the Chittenden County Homeless Alliance, showed an overall increase in homelessness by 11% compared to the 2016 Point-in-Time Count. While there was an overall statewide increase, there were striking regional differences, including decreases in Chittenden (-12%) and Franklin (-17%) counties. Included in the total were 306 children, representing 25% of the entire homeless population counted.

“The work of local communities, with the help of local, state and federal investments, is needed now more than ever,” said MaryEllen Mendl, Co-Chair of the Vermont Coalition to End Homelessness. “The Trump budget would cut off affordable housing assistance to more than 700 Vermont families, putting them at risk of eviction and homelessness.”

The report comes from data collected for the Annual Point-in-Time Count, an unduplicated count of persons experiencing literal homelessness on the night of January 24, 2017.  The Count was organized by Vermont’s two federally-recognized Continua of Care (CoC), the Chittenden County CoC and the 11 local coalitions that make up the Balance of State CoC. These networks are comprised of homeless and human service organizations, housing agencies, government agencies, health care providers, private funders, and other partners that strive to eliminate homelessness in Vermont.

Margaret Bozik, Co-Chair of the Chittenden County Homeless Alliance, stated, “We are pleased to see a continuing decrease in homelessness in Chittenden County. We are now seeing family homelessness decline as well as reductions in the number of people who have experienced homelessness for long periods of time in Chittenden County.  It’s very encouraging to see the state looking to make new investments in affordable housing, though the proposed federal cuts are troubling.”

Additional Point-in-Time Count Findings: 

  • The number of unsheltered persons counted was 134, a 14% decrease from last year.
  • Just under half of persons (47%) were homeless for the first time.
  • 267 persons (22%) reported as survivors of domestic violence, a 40-person increase from 2016.
  • Due to coordinated statewide efforts, the population of homeless veterans has steadily declined since the 2013 Count. 2017 saw a continuation of this downward trend with 94 veterans counted, a 15% decrease compared to last year.
  • 340 persons reported a severe mental illness, or 28% of total persons. 228 persons reported having a substance abuse disorder, or 19% of total persons.

Read full press release here.

 

 

 

 

 

Vermont 2-1-1 · PO Box 111 · Essex Junction, VT 05453 · USA

 

Read More

FamilyWize – Health and Wellness Newsletter – July, 2017

 

FamilyWize Logo

Health and Wellness Newsletter – July, 2017

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Each Year Millions Of Americans Face The Challenge Of Living With A Mental Health Condition

 

 

Mental illness affects one in five adults and one in 10 children in America, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Furthermore, mental illness is a leading cause of disability, yet nearly two-thirds of people with a diagnosable mental illness do not seek treatment, and racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. are even less likely to get help, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.1

Mental health conditions do not discriminate based on race, color, gender or identity. Anyone can experience the challenges of mental illness regardless of their background. However, culture, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation can make access to mental health treatment much more difficult.
When trying to access treatment, these communities have to contend with:

  • Language barriers
  • A culturally insensitive system
  • Racism, bias and discrimination in treatment settings
  • Lower quality care
  • Lower chance of health care coverage
  • Stigma from several angles (for being a minority and for having mental illness) 2

As a result, minorities are less likely to receive treatment for their mental illness, have less access to mental health services and often receive a poorer quality of mental health care.

Help raise awareness in your organization or community by encouraging family, friends, clients and loved ones to learn more about improving mental health during Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

 

 

Events

OMH (Office of Minority Health) will participate in upcoming Twitter chats this month. You can join by following @MinorityHealth.

HRSA’s Behavioral Health
Thurs, July 20, 3-4pm ET
Host: @NHSCorps
#BHealthy

Minority Mental Health Disparities
Tues, July 25, 1-2pm ET
Host: @SaludToday
#SaludTues

Resources:

  1. (OMH) U.S. Department of Human Health and Services, Office of Minority Health
  2. (NAMI) National Alliance on Mental Illness
&nbps;


Quick Tips


Drug Price Lookup Tool

 

 

While at your doctor’s office, use the Drug Price Look-up Tool in the FamilyWize mobile app to see which pharmacy will have the lowest price for your prescription. Then ask your doctor to send your prescription to that pharmacy.

It’s that easy!

START SAVING NOW!

FamilyWize Card
Download a Free Card
Apple Store Google Play

Facebook Twitter Instagram Linkedin Pinterest You Tube Blog

 

 


FamilyWize/UW Logo

© Copyright 2017 FamilyWize Community Service Partnership, Inc.

 


 

 

Read More

VFF Newsletter – July 2017

 

July 2017

 

…a message from the VFFCMH Board of Directors
Having served VFFCMH for over 13 years, Executive Director Kathy Holsopple has announced that she and her family will be leaving Vermont to begin their next great adventure, in Virginia. Ever committed to the families and the functioning of the VFFCMH, Kathy will continue to serve VFFCMH remotely over the next few months. Cindy Marshall Tabor, Assistant Director, will transition into the role of Interim Executive Director.

We anticipate a smooth transition as VFFCMH has had a strong, stable, cross-trained leadership team in Kathy & Cindy for many years. This forward-thinking management plan affords the VFFCMH Board, Staff and Partners an opportunity to thoughtfully and purposefully continue evaluation of efforts (thank you Susan Yuan, PhD) to accomplish our mission, realize a vision, and prioritize next steps as we approach our 30th anniversary. There is depth in the skill set of VFFCMH staff that positions VFFCMH well. They are eager, as are several new members of the Board, to build on a foundation that has been well constructed.

Kathy’s last day at VFFCMH is August 3rd. Sadly, this does not give us an opportunity to bid her a proper, public and well-deserved “Bon Fortuna” celebration and send off. Please reach out and wish her well. Our loss will greatly benefit those she will serve in the years to come. We are excited for her and her family. We are extremely grateful for the passion and compassion she has brought and the legacy she leaves. Godspeed Kathy, Dennis and Josh! You will be missed…

 

 

 

 

I recently read a true story of the journey of a new naturalized US citizen. I was so inspired to read of her and her family’s loyalty and commitment to the “American dream” that led to intense commitment to our country, constitution and diversity. Her commitment also came from a place of her faith in God, as has many current and former Americans. As I pondered her experience, I thought of where we are in history as a nation. I also wondered, are we, who are born citizens of this great country, even aware of what that citizenship affords us or requires of us? I looked up the oath of citizenship to see what New Americans are committing to when they become citizens. Dare we, who are born here as citizens, commit to any less?

 

 Kathy
Oath of Citizenship

 

I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

 

 

 Happy Birthday USA

Show you care as we celebrate our nation’s birthday and beyond. Be an advocate for your family, the families you love and serve, and those who cannot speak up for themselves, our children. My favorite definition of advocate is “to make someone care.” Let’s continue to advocate, make people care about, our children. I know it has been said repeatedly that the children are the future, but it honestly cannot be said enough! Helping our children and families to be successful now, ensures a brighter future for Vermont!

 

 

Parent Representatives needed in Bennington, Brattleboro, Hartford, Newport, St Albans and Middlebury 
Vermont’s ACT 264 legislation created a system that supports families at a community level by offering Coordination of Services, CSP, to those families in complex situations needing services from more than one agency or service system.
Act 264 legislation believes that Parents are valuable contributing members of their child’s Individual Treatment Team and know their child’s needs, strengths, and challenges. The Parent Representative, Parent Rep, role brings a parent voice and the parent voice into the process.
Parent Reps can assist families prior to a CSP or LIT meeting, at a CSP or LIT meeting and after these meetings. 
The Parent Rep is a volunteer who is supported by a stipend and mileage.  Parent Reps are chosen by the LIT members. The Vermont Federation of Families assists to find, recruit and train parents for this role. The time commitment for a Parent Rep is usually one LIT meeting of 1-2 hours per month and several hours per month or week to support families around their coordinated services meetings and plan.      
To consider becoming and/or apply to be your local Parent Rep please contact ctabor@vffcmh.org

 

Check these out!

 

 

 

Mental Health Always Matters Children’s PSA Mental Health Always Matters Family PSA I Am the World
Diversity Rocks
STAY CONNECTED:
Vermont Federation of Families, PO Box 1577, Williston, VT 05495

 

Read More