Nominate a Volunteer of the Month

Does your organization have an incredible volunteer? Nominate them to be a Volunteer of the Month with Green Mountain United Way!

Every month we feature a local volunteer at Green Mountain United Way or one of our agency partners to feature on our blog and an article in the Times Argus. Do you have a new volunteer who you appreciate, a long-time volunteer who deserves some recognition, an individual who has made an exceptional difference for the work your organization does?
GREAT! Nominate them here:

After we receive your nomination, we will contact your volunteer for an interview. Volunteer of the Month articles appear monthly in the Times Argus. Read about all of our past Volunteers of the Month here!

Thank you to you and to all of the incredible volunteers that make our community a better place!

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15th Annual Green Mountain United Way Golf Classic – 2019

Green Mountain United Way Golf Classic

Friday, July 26, 2019

at the Country Club of Barre (18-hole course)

Shotgun Start at 9:00 am

Join us to support the community and have fun while you do it at the 15th Annual Green Mountain United Way Annual Golf Classic! A beautiful day on the green makes you a partner in United Way’s fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community in our five-county region including Caledonia, Essex, Orleans, Orange and Washington counties.

We are glad to have you on our team for this tournament and in our work to bring together individuals, businesses, government, human service agencies and volunteers around a common vision to create maximum impact and achieve long-lasting results. Your support helps foster children transition to a new home with a backpack of their own, helps families get the financial skills they need to make sure they have stable, healthy lives and helps low-income employees access the resources they need to thrive. Don’t miss your chance to join us! Registration and Sponsorship are NOW OPEN!

Thanks to our committed 2019 Sponsors!

Silver Level Sponsors

Community National Bank

 

Prize Sponsors


Registration

Register for $100 per individual golfer or $400 per team of four

ALL Registrations Include: Greens Fees, Two Carts, Registration Gifts, and Dinner

Register online using the button below or download our registration form and mail it with your check.

Register Now


Course Description

Founded in 1924, the Country Club of Barre is considered one of the “must play” courses in central Vermont. Nestled in the rolling hills of Plainfield Vermont, the Country Club of Barre offers a unique and rewarding golf experience.

You will not only experience golf at its finest, but you will also enjoy scenic views of the beautiful Vermont landscape while you golf.

The course is designed with all players in mind, from the beginner to the experienced. From high handicap to low handicap, all levels of experience will find the course challenging and rewarding


Event Highlights

Format: 4 player scramble. The traditional format where all players tee off, the best shot is selected, and the process is repeated until a ball is holed. Every team must use at least three tee shots from each player.

Smash The Glass Contest: Our friends at Portland Glass will be there with their Smash The Glass set-up. Smash the Glass & win some cash!

Hospitality: Gifts for all golfers at tournament check-in, plus complimentary light snacks and bottled water out on the course from the refreshment cart.

50/50 Raffle: The total amount raised will be split between the winner and Green Mountain United Way to benefit their programs and ongoing work within the community.

Dinner: Immediately following the tournament the meal will begin featuring the world-class food from the Cornerstone Catering. A cash bar will also be available.

Prizes & Awards: Many prizes awarded for High Score, Longest Drive, Closest to Pin, Low Gross/Net and more.


Schedule

8:00 am On-site registration begins. Please be sure to arrive no later than 8:15 am to allow time to check-in and warm-up on the putting green and driving range.

8:50 am Welcome announcement from Sponsors, Country Club and Green Mountain United Way. Golfers then proceed to their designated holes for a 9:00 am shotgun start.

9:00 am Shotgun start.

1:00 pm(approximate) Luncheon begins as teams return

2:00 pm(approximate)  50/50 Raffle winner announced, followed by contest winner awards, and tournament low gross/low net winning team awards.

3:00 pm Event concludes


Become a Sponsor and help us reach our goal fo $20,000 to support our community!

Support Green Mountain United Way and have fun doing it! Click the drop-down to see the benefits of each sponsorship level. We work to support our entire community and so will your sponsorship dollars. To become a Corporate Sponsor, call Carrie at 802-613-3989 to find the right level for you, or simply download our 2019 Sponsorship Form, fill it out and email it to Carrie Stahler at cstahler[at] gmunitedway.org.

Sponsorship Goal for 2019: $20,000

Prominent placement in all promotional materials, Speaking opportunity prior to the meal, 4 complimentary registrations for your staff, plus all other items offered at Eagle Level (except registrations)
Online logo placement on gmunitedway.org reg. page, Logo on Beverage Cart & Players Carts
4 complimentary registrations for your staff, Plus all other items offered at Eagle Level (except registrations)
One exclusive sponsorship offered at this level, Exclusive Speaking opportunity at Dinner, Online logo placement on gmunitedway.org reg. page, Logo on Beverage Cart & Players Carts
Social media recognition of your business
This sponsor level is to be “paid” with the in-kind contribution of golf prizes to be used as swag bags for participants, bag stuffers and raffle prizes. Imagine a small bag filled with golf balls, tees, and a golf towel all featuring your company’s logo! For further details, contact Carrie at cstahler (at) gmunitedway.org
Banner above clubhouse for duration of event, Logo on all players carts during event, 2 total complimentary registrations for your staff, Plus all offered below (except registrations)
We know some of you would love to just spend a day golfing with your crew for a good cause. For you, we’ve created a special sponsor level! You get Four (4) complimentary registrations for your staff and a tee sign on one green with your company’s logo
Social media recognition of your business, 1 complimentary registration for your staff, Plus all offered below
Recognition on Beverage Cart, Tee/Greens Sign on One Green
Tee sign on one green

 

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Athletes stand in 3 rows after a workout

Local Hero: Troy Lawson for The Phoenix-Vermont

by Green Mountain United Way Volunteer Writer Robert Barossi

Coach Troy, second from the right, chats with athletes before a Pheonix workout in Barre.

An estimated 20.7 million adults in the United States needed treatment for drug or substance abuse in 2017, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. One national nonprofit working to provide a unique approach to recovery support is The Phoenix. Founded in 2006, the organization works to provide a sober active community for people in recovery and now offers free activity programs in many states, where it has served over 26,000 people since it’s inception.

Arriving here in 2018, The Phoenix has a number of programs in central Vermont, including one led by CrossFit coach, and volunteer of the month, Troy Lawson.

“I’ve been a personal trainer for a lot of years,” he says. “It was back in 2012 when I started doing CrossFit and I fell l in love with the idea of class participation and having an instructor and having somebody oversee your movement and oversee how you are moving. I was just drawn to it and I went and got certified and started coaching at Green Mountain CrossFit.”

Troy heard about The Phoenix program through Tawnya Kristen, of Green Mountain United Way, who was one of the driving forces behind bringing it to Vermont. “Tawnya started hosting the first class in Vermont at Green Mountain CrossFit and she was encouraging people to help out and volunteer,” he says. “She wasn’t really sure what the impact was going to be on the community but it’s been huge.”

He notes that one of the requirements to take part in the program while in recovery is that participants have to have 48 hours of continuous sobriety. “The goal was to try to set up something in the central Vermont area that would keep their interest peaked at least every 48 hours. When Tawnya started reaching out to try to find another location to host The Phoenix, she reached out to me cause I have a relationship with Washington County Mental Health. She knew I had some space down there to host another one of the programs. She drew me in that way and it’s been amazing.”

While he wasn’t necessarily looking for volunteer opportunities, Troy comments that everything fell into place really well. “It wasn’t a hard decision,” he adds. “I had to think about it for a little while, of course, but I was willing to do it. To participate in The Phoenix and see what Tawnya and Shannon Brennan [a mental health counselor at Central Vermont Substance Abuse] have brought to the central Vermont area, it’s pretty amazing, it’s really hard to say no to them.”

“It isn’t a replacement for the meetings and it’s not a replacement for the 12-step program,’ Troy says. “There’s a lot of stigma around recovery, so The Phoenix gives them a positive way to interact with each other that maybe was lacking. So that’s one piece. There’s the fitness piece, giving them the opportunity to experience something that’s going to benefit them in the long run. Another piece is that these people are in a pretty vulnerable spot in their lives and Tawnya is really gentle and kind and she’s very welcoming. That definitely made it more appealing for me to be a part of something that was bigger than myself.”

On Saturdays, you may find Troy helping Tawnya at Green Mountain CrossFit, but his Wednesday night programs happen at Washington County Mental Health’s WellSpace in Barre. He calls the diversity of people who participate in the program fascinating, noting the wide variety. “One thing I’ve learned is addiction is across the board. Men and women. Older and younger. It doesn’t matter how much income you have or any of that stuff. It’s really amazing to see the folks that come there and allow themselves to be vulnerable and put themselves out there and they’re trying something new.”

And while CrossFit can seem a little intimidating at first to some, the program is also open to anyone, regardless of their fitness level. Nobody is turned away. At the same time, Troy notes, CrossFit provides an amazing sense of community because everyone works together as a group.

“It’s definitely bigger than yourself. Your giving back to something that’s really a big deal,” Troy says, adding that there are moments of true vulnerability and sharing of personal stories which he says can be powerful, difficult and inspiring. “To just be a part of something like that and to give that to my community is pretty cool. It’s hard to put into words exactly how it feels. I just feel grateful that they allow me to be a part of their recovery.”

Local Heroes is a feature compiled by the Green Mountain United Way focusing on the contributions of local volunteers whose gift of time benefits local nonprofit organizations in Green Mountain United Way’s five-county service territory. For more information, or to nominate a volunteer to be featured here, go to www.gmunitedway.org/volunteer-of-the-month.

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Local Hero: Jay Sprout for Catamount Arts

by Robert Barossi, Green Mountain United Way volunteer writer

Bluegrass bands. Vaudeville acts. Magicians and hypnotists. If all that and more is happening and it’s New Year’s Eve in Vermont, you may be in St. Johnsbury. And if you are at First Night North in St. Johnsbury, then somewhere in the crowd is volunteer Jay Sprout, doing whatever he can to make the event a success.

A native of Ohio, Jay came to New England by way of Yale Divinity School in New Haven, Connecticut. He eventually set his sights on the northern part of the region, where he felt more at home. In 1982, Jay landed in St. Johnsbury, where he took a position as the minister of the North Congregational Church.

Jay Sprout, ready for First Night!

“My church strongly supported me having community involvement and they were totally behind me giving part of my time to working on first night. I had a flexible schedule and could schedule times when I would be working on first night in addition to my job,” he says.

The original impetus to start working on a first night event was twenty-six years ago, after Jay attended first night in Burlington, something he describes as “a very positive community experience.” After that, he and the pastor at South Congregational Church in St. Johnsbury talked about having a similar event in their city, something “that would be similar, on a smaller scale perhaps, but would be just as positive for the community and provide an equal range of entertainment on New Year’s Eve and cut down on the use of substances, drugs and alcohol.”

“That has always been a focus of first nights in general and we thought it would be a very positive part of what we could do with our first night in St. Johnsbury,” he adds, noting that it has been a very successful event in that regard. “So far as I know, there has not been any police action needed on New Year’s Eve in St. Johnsbury since we started.”

Jay’s involvement with first night has changed and grown since it began, back when the event was funded by a federal grant aimed at substance abuse prevention. “The original people who put it together with that federal grant did a fantastic job of identifying the many venues in St. Johnsbury where entertainment could be held and then regional entertainers who wanted to participate,” Jay says. “They really set the model and we had such an enormous success that first year that it sort of took off. We have certainly expanded the number of venues. Last year, we had eighteen venues in thirteen buildings, for eight hours, presenting, I think, 83 acts by 60 or so different groups or artists.”

For the past nine years, Catamount Arts has played a large role in keeping first night going and successful, and Jay has remained as involved as ever. He says his favorite role is “the actual curating and figuring out who is going to come and trying to put together a program that offers a wide variety of entertainment. The vast majority of first night entertainment is musicians, we try to make sure that we have music to suit every taste, all the way from bluegrass and folk to classical performances and everything in between. You name it, I think we’ve pretty much covered it.”

Those acts, including Bob Amos & Catamount Crossing’s bluegrass band, Vermont Vaudeville, Nimble Arts Ruckus Circus, magician hypnotist Marko, and many more, fill the numerous St. Johnsbury venues for eight and a half hours, from 4pm until after the midnight fireworks. The diverse variety of acts originate from all over our region and Jay notes it’s not just the performers who come from far and wide.

“We really do think of this as a regional event that covers northern New Hampshire as well as the upper valley of Vermont and New Hampshire and all the way to Newport,” he says. “St. Johnsbury is really blessed with a lot of really good venues that are all in a pretty tight area, so that people can get from one end to the other and walk about a half-mile. That is really remarkable. It’s very different from other cities that try to hold these kinds of events.”

If Jay’s work with First Night North seems like a year-round job, it is. And, while it may be a lot of work, it’s worth it for Jay when he walks around on New Year’s Eve and sees people of all types having a really good time. “It’s far more inclusive of the entire community than a lot of the other arts performances tend to be. We also try to make sure that everybody can afford it, so the price is kept low. For those who really can’t afford it, we have connections with social service agencies and we give away three to five hundred free buttons every year to families.”

“As I walk down the street, a lot of people recognize me and say thank you. It obviously makes me feel good that they recognize that we have given a wonderful gift to the community,” he notes, adding, “At the same time, I feel very humbled because I know that I don’t do it alone by any means.”

Still, there are some who are unaware of the event or aren’t interested because first nights, in general, can sometimes get a bad rap. “Any time I get a chance to talk to somebody who hasn’t found out about it, I try to give them a picture of what a wonderful community event it is and how much fun they can have on New Year’s Eve without going to a party that is serving alcohol or just being isolated unto themselves,” Jay says. “The community experience is really wonderful. People who attend are also ambassadors for the event and I hear time and time again how much it’s become their own New Year’s Eve tradition.”

Being a part of that tradition is just one of Jay’s volunteer efforts, which also include being on the Board of Directors for Northeast Kingdom Habitat for Humanity, among other community activities. He points to the words of Saint Francis of Assisi, “It is in giving that we receive,” as one reason why he puts so much time, energy, passion and dedication into these efforts, adding, “I think that’s a truth about life. If you live it in isolation, you definitely are missing out on what life is all about.”

The Local Heros is a monthly feature compiled by the Green Mountain United Way focusing on the contributions of local volunteers whose efforts benefit local nonprofit organizations in Green Mountain United Way’s service territory in Caledonia, Essex, Orange, Orleans and Washington Counties. For more information, or to nominate a volunteer to be featured here, go to www.gmunitedway.org/volunteer-of-the-month.

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2019 National Association Of Letter Carriers’ Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive

Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive

Is your United Way participating in the 2019 National Association of Letter Carriers’ Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive? Every second Saturday in May, letter carriers in more than 10,000 cities and towns across America collect the goodness and compassion of their postal customers, who participate in the NALC Stamp Out Hunger National Food Drive — the largest one-day food drive in the nation.

Led by letter carriers represented by the National Association of Letter Carriers (AFL-CIO), with help from rural letter carriers, other postal employees and other volunteers, the drive has delivered more than one billion pounds of food the past 25 years.

Carriers collect non-perishable food donations left by mailboxes and in post offices and deliver them to local community food banks, pantries and shelters. Nearly 1,500 NALC branches in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands are involved.

United Way is proud to support the Stamp Out Hunger Fund Drive.

Download the flyer HERE.

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I volunteer because…

April is National Volunteer Month and here at United Way, we know that Volunteers make the world go ’round!

For so many nonprofits, volunteers are the beating heart of our work and make many of our local nonprofit’s missions possible. This month, we want to sing it from the hilltops, so we’re hosting a virtual Volunteer Share!

We’d like your help – get in on the action by printing the “I volunteer because…” sign (link below) and posting a photo of yourself on Facebook page and sharing it on yours and tagging Green Mountain United Way.

How it works:

  1. Print the sign
  2. Write in why you volunteer! (could be as simple as “because it makes me happy!” or as complicated as you like, just make it legible! There is a word doc in case typing is easier.)
  3. Take a selfie or have someone take your photo holding the sign
  4. Post it on your Facebook page and tag Green Mountain United Way and then post it on our Facebook page (better yet, also tag the organization you volunteer for!) 
  5. Email it to me and we’ll post it on our page and here on this blog post!

Downloads

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Lift UP!

Lift Up! Benefit at Green Mountain CrossFit

Lift Up! Benefit
Saturday, April 6, 2019
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Join Green Mountain CrossFit and Green Mountain United Way for a day of weightlifting to raise funds for Green Mountain United Way. 50% of all proceeds go to Green Mountain United Way to support the fantastic work they do in and around our local community. Try for a new personal record and support a great cause!
The format will be a single registration at $50. Registration allows you to establish a one rep max in any or all of six lifts: Shoulder Press, Bench Press, Back Squat, Deadlift, Snatch, and Clean & Jerk. This is a non-sanctioned, family-friendly lifting event and is open to all ages and abilities. Each year many personal bests are reached, and we expect more of the same this year with support from an enthusiastic crowd of lifters, CrossFit athletes, and the local community. Lifting is not required to attend, and we encourage the general public to show up and cheer on regular folks from the local community doing extraordinary lifts for a great cause. There are also many opportunities to volunteer to support this event.
For more information about the competition go to www.facebook.com/greenmountaincrossfit. Register online at www.greenmountaincrossfit.com/events. For more information about the event, contact Green Mountain CrossFit at their Berlin location at 802-229-4131 or at nick@greenmountaincrossfit.com.

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K.E.E.P. Financial Coaching – Intro to Financial Coaching Training

Thanks for your interest in becoming a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach. This session’s registration is now FULL. If you would like to have your name added to our waiting list, please email Beckie with your name, title, organization, and contact information and she will add you to the list. You will be contacted only if a spot becomes available.

If you are interested in receiving notice when our Fall 2019 Cohort opens up for registration, please email Beckie and ask to have your name added to the Fall Cohort announcement. The Fall 2019 Cohort training will take place in Central Vermont.

Financial coaching is an emerging practice that helps clients learn to set and achieve their financial goals.

Green Mountain United Way, in partnership with Capstone Community Action, presents Introduction to Financial Coaching. This interactive 4-day training is open to agency staff, volunteers, and peers and is a prerequisite to becoming a Financial Coach with Green Mountain United Way’s K.E.E.P. Financial Coaching Program. This program provides additional supports for coaches including one-on-one Master Coaching sessions, peer-to-peer support, and ongoing training by local and regional experts in finance and coaching practices, along with access to all course materials. This program builds an individual coach’s skills while helping clients.

DATES: March 26-28, 2019 from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm with a follow-up class on May 8, 2019 from
9:00 am to 4:00 pm

All four training dates take place in Northern Counties Health Care, 185 Sherman Drive, St. Johnsbury (near Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital).

Register Now

In this training, we will define financial coaching, provide financial capability content and demonstrate the benefits of using coaching in helping people to achieve financial success. This program uses the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s “Your Money, Your Goals,” a comprehensive financial empowerment toolkit created for financial coaches, caseworkers, and other human service professionals in various roles to support the integration of financial education into their one-on-one work with clients.

Join us for coffee, doors open at 8:45 am, and the training starts promptly at 9:00 am. Lunch will be provided. The $100 fee covers instruction, materials, and food for all four days of the course.

The Spring 2019 Cohort of Financial Coaches is limited to 20 people – we expect this cohort to fill, please register for Intro to Financial Coaching early if you would like to join this program. Participation in this training is required to become a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach. Other required elements of this program include:

  • Attendance at two additional topic-specific trainings (1/2 day or full day) during the training year (September – June)
  • Attendance at bi-annual peer coaches meetings
  • Participation in one-on-one sessions with the Master Coach
  • Work with the Master Coach and your organization to integrate this program into your agency’s practice
  • Use of the Financial Capability Scale for pre- and post-client session surveys with whom you do Financial Coaching work to report data

At the end of day three of this training Financial Coaches will be eligible to attend all additional trainings offered. Please see the full description of our K.E.E.P. Financial Coaching Program and the complete list of trainings for the 2019 year at www.gmunitedway.org/keep.

WHEN:
March 26-28, 2019
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Follow up class on May 8, 2019
9:00 am to 4:00 pm

WHERE:
Northern Counties Health Care
Basement Conference Room
185 Sherman Drive (the last building on Sherman Drive)
St. Johnsbury, VT

Cost: $100 includes materials, light breakfast, and lunch for all four days of the training. Please pay by check to Green Mountain United Way, 73 Main Street #33, Montpelier, VT 05602 after you register using this link or the form below.

ACCOMMODATION REQUESTS RELATED TO A DISABILITY AND SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS SHOULD BE MADE AT LEAST TWO WEEKS PRIOR TO THE EVENT BY CONTACTING BECKIE BLOUIN AT RBLOUIN@GMUNITEDWAY.ORG OR 802.613.3989.

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Volunteer of the Month: Darcy and Rags

The train depot in St. Johnsbury in the late 1800s or early 1900s was a bustling hub of transportation and commerce. Products of the industrial revolution boom town making their way to distant parts unknown. Passengers inside the 1883 Queen Anne-style building, awaiting their train on one of the railroad lines stopping there. Today, when you stop by the station, you find a welcome center, the town’s offices, exhibits on the area’s history, and volunteers like Darcy LaPointe and her dog Rags, ready to greet you with a warm and welcoming smile.



Born in North Carolina, Darcy spent most her life living in Minneapolis, after moving around quite a bit as a child. While the weather here might have its similarities to Minnesota, she says, “Vermont is so different from the way I was living before. I had to learn a lot.” Specifically, she adds,small-town life was the biggest adjustment.

“I never expected to live in a small town,” Darcy says. “We moved out here because my daughter decided to teach, she graduated and was going to start teaching. She wanted to teach at a small school and we thought, ‘well, we could go to northern Minnesota, but we could go anywhere.’ She teaches science and math and was really interested in the environment, and that’s a leading thing that we found here, interest in the environment.”

After relocating here, Darcy began working with Vermont Associates for Training and Development, an organization that provides training and employment services for adults aged 55 or older. “What they do is, anyone who is over age 54 and doesn’t have a job, or if they have a disability, can go and learn different jobs in different areas that are mostly volunteer-type jobs,” Darcy says. “You can be at Catamount Arts or you could be at the museum or you could be at the library and be learning new things so that maybe you can find work somewhere. I worked at the welcome center for a while, as a part-time thing and I really liked it.”

That experience led her to begin working at the welcome center as a volunteer, around three years ago, she says. Originally, she worked three days per week but has recently gone down to two days, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, between two and five. She’ll be at the counter as soon as you walk in, accompanied by her toy poodle, Rags.

“He always greets everybody with me. I feel like he is the one that is the biggest welcome,” she says, adding that Rags takes a job that she thought she could never do and makes it possible for her. “I always have been very quiet and alone and not really…to actually help visitors who come to the town, this was really a challenge for me. Rags has made it so easy. People come in and they smile, they see him and he’s just adorable and they love him. It makes it so easy. People that love dogs always come up and talk to me about him. People who aren’t that interested, he doesn’t bother. He doesn’t bark, he doesn’t do any of those things. He likes to lay down and look like he is real tired so people will come and pet him.”

“I enjoy helping people if they are confused or if they don’t know what we have or what to do or something like that. It’s really a nice position for me,” Darcy says. Most of the questions she gets are about where to eat or stay in town, giving her a chance to recommend some of the great places in St. Johnsbury. “We have a lot of really good places to eat. So, it’s pretty much what they want, what kind of food they want. With motels, I always try to help them find something that is within their budget.”

One of the other great things about the job, she says, is the chance to meet and get to know some of the residents of a town she describes as “incredibly interesting,” primarily due to its long and fascinating history. “I’ve met so many people from the town because I see them come in to go into the town offices or the clerk. The ones who have been here their whole life, they have so many stories to tell me about what it has been like. I really appreciate it.”

Darcy also appreciates the opportunity to meet people from “everywhere,” noting that she encounters visitors from places as varied as England, Australia and Argentina. “That really makes my day when I get to meet somebody from that far away and they’re coming here and they’re appreciating all the things that we have here.”

Returning visitors give her a chance to develop a bit more of a relationship with some people, who she says always remember her and the “mascot” of the St. Johnsbury welcome center. She adds with a laugh, “They don’t ever forget me because I have Rags.”

Greeters like Darcy and Rags welcome over 10,000 visitors to the St. Johnsbury Welcome Center each year. In 2018, they saw visitors from all over the United States, including predictable visits from states in New England, but also visits from Indiana, Florida, California and other states. Additionally, the Welcome Center helped to introduce St. Johnsbury to visitors from 245 countries, as far away as Peru, Kazakhstan, and Norway, and as close as Canada. The Welcome Center is an important link that gives visitors the tools they need to navigate Vermont’s rural landscape, enjoy the natural beauty, recreation, food, and fun they came to find in the Northeast Kingdom, and support the vitality of the wonderful communities that we locals get to enjoy all year long.

The Volunteer of the Month is a feature compiled by the Green Mountain United Way focusing on the contributions of local volunteers whose volunteer work benefits local nonprofit organizations in Green Mountain United Way’s service territory. For more information, or to nominate a volunteer to be featured here, go to www.gmunitedway.org/volunteer-of-the-month.

Photo credit: St. Johnsbury Welcome Center

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How Rachel uses financial coaching to help women at Vermont Works for Women

Rachel, the Job Developer at Vermont Works for Women, was recently certified as a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach. As part of the economic stability work that she does, Rachel helps women improve their resumes, as well as set and plan for career goals, but recently she was asked to present to a group of women at a domestic violence shelter here in Northern Vermont about money management basics. The women in the group all live together at the shelter and are comfortable and familiar with one another so discussing finances was something they felt able to do together. Rachel decided to use her Financial Coaching skills to help them build skills and learn new tools during her time with them.

For many women domestic abuse and financial abuse often go together. Some of the women in attendance had left difficult circumstances with little or no money because their former partner had emptied their shared bank accounts. Circumstances like these make financial conversations even more difficult because of the strong emotions associated with money.

For the workshop, Rachel set her own goal of sharing some of the basic money-management skills she had learned in becoming a K.E.E.P. Financial Coach:

  • Using a cash-flow spending plan and scheduling bills/expenses to line up with income so you can make it through the month
  • Tracking expenses in order to know where your money is going
  • Saving money for emergencies with a goal of $500
  • Plugging spending leaks, exercising mindfulness around spending, and looking to reduce, not necessarily eliminate, certain spending
  • Making SMART financial goals

Many of the participants had never heard of SMART goal setting. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound and is used in financial coaching to break down a big goal (I want to buy a house) into smaller goals that work toward that end (I want to raise my credit score 50 points by next May).

One participant was hoping to get her own apartment and the group workshopped her goal to help her break it down into smaller SMART goals with deadlines. They determined how much she would need to save each week, how she was going to logistically make sure that the money was saved – would she put cash aside in an envelope? Open a separate savings account? Could she have a portion of her paycheck automatically deposited? Did she have to visit the bank each week? In the end, the woman left with a step-by-step plan that was tailored to her specific needs, habits, and life, and she knew exactly how she was going to save up for an apartment.

Rachel was glad to see the women each considering how the different skills and tools she brought could make a difference in their specific circumstances.

As a coach, Rachel plans to continue to use these tools with the women she sees one-on-one and other small groups that Vermont Works for Women assists.

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